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Honorary Members

2011 Annual Meeting - A Day for Teachers

21st Annual Meeting

Thursday – Saturday, October 13 – 15, 2011
Special Interest Groups Day Sunday, October 16, 2011

Washington, DC, USA


A Day for Teachers


A Day for Teachers, Supplementary Training: Fitness for the Dancing Body, will focus on a variety of approaches to training beyond the dance class. Through lectures and movement sessions, teachers will learn about methods to enhance strength, flexibility, cardio-respiratory endurance, balance and coordination, and how to improve alignment and motor patterns for dance practice. more...

Sunday, October 16, 2011

8:00 - 8:30 am Welcome: Registration and Refreshments

8:30 - 8:45 am Opening Remarks


8:45 - 9:30 am Muscular strength and dance training
Johanna Osmala, PT, and Jarmo Ahonen, PT, Finnish National Ballet, Helsinki, Finland

9:30 - 10:15 am Flexibility and dance training
Moira McCormack, MSc, PT, Head of Physiotherapy, The Royal Ballet Company, London, UK

10:15 - 10:45 am Refreshment Break

10:45 - 11:30 am Aerobic training and the dancer

Emma Redding, MSc, PhD, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK

11:45 am - 12:45 pm Concurrent movement sessions:
Movement session 1: Muscular strength and dance training
Johanna Osmala, PT, and Jarmo Ahonen, PT, Finnish National Ballet, Helsinki, Finland

Movement session 2: Fitness yoga for the dancer
Charlotte Tomlinson, MSc, PGCE, Leicester College and Fit4Dance, Leicester, UK

Movement session 3: Balancing Bodies with Pilates
Kimberly Karpanty, MA, MFA, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA

12:45 - 1:45 pm Buffet Lunch (for all delegates
)

1:45 - 2:30 pm Neuromotor aspects of conditioning for dancers: What role does the brain play?

Janet Karin, OAM, The Australian Ballet School, Melbourne, Australia

2:45 - 3:45 pm Concurrent movement sessions:
Movement session 4: Challenging and improving the sensorimotor systems
Megan Richardson, MS, ATC, Harkness Center for Dance Injuries, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York, USA

Movement session 5: Bartenieff FundamentalsSM applied to dance: an introduction
Anne Burnidge, MFA, CLMA, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA

Movement session 6: Introduction to the fundamental movement patterns and principles of Gyrokinesis®
Nancie Lepore, BEd, Montréal, Québec, Canada

3:50 - 4:00 pm Closing Remarks

Program subject to change

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A Day for Teachers Organizing Committee
Donna Krasnow, MS, Chair
Jarmo Ahonen, PT
Jeffrey A. Russell, PhD, ATC
Virginia Wilmerding, PhD

A Day for Teachers, Supplementary Training: Fitness for the Dancing Body, will focus on a variety of approaches to training beyond the dance class. Through lectures and movement sessions, teachers will learn about methods to enhance strength, flexibility, cardio-respiratory endurance, balance and coordination, and how to improve alignment and motor patterns for dance practice. more...

In the lecture on strength training for dancers, three main lines of research will be discussed: strength endurance, velocity strength, and explosive strength. Additionally the difference between static, concentric and eccentric strength training will be explained. The following topics will be examined: (1) What are the strength demands in dance, and what are the gender differences; (2) What anatomical areas need strength in dance, e.g., core, scapular stabilizers, and leg muscles; and (3) What is the connection between control and strength in dance? Finally the psychological impact of strength training on mental attitude and self-esteem will be discussed.

The second lecture will focus on muscular flexibility as a necessary component of professional dance training. Dancers who are genetically predisposed to hypermobility require work on stability, while the tighter physique requires flexibility work as part of a balanced training program. Various methods of flexibility training will be discussed with physiological explanations, including: PNF, contract/relax, static stretching, prolonged stretching, ballistic stretching, and yoga. The main muscle groups requiring flexibility work will be discussed, as well as how to stretch them. Additional topics will include flexibility work in relation to gender and age, safety issues, and concerns related to the hypermobile dancer.

The third lecture will describe the physiological demands of dance in order to highlight the need for aerobic training for dancers. A short overview of energy systems will be provided followed by a review of methods of aerobic training and recommendations for dance educators. Reference will be made to the concepts of overload, specificity and individuality. The lecture will also cover the role of nutrition for dancers in the context of the anaerobic demands of dance.

The final lecture will focus on the neuromuscular aspects of conditioning. A short introduction will give an overview of the way the brain controls movement, and the relevance of the mind / body connection in utilizing the benefits of dancers’ conditioning. Imagery and other somatic approaches will be discussed as tools for overcoming physical limitations and for increasing movement efficiency in various techniques and in daily life.

Participants will be able to select two out of six movement sessions, sessions 1-3 in the morning and sessions 4-6 in the afternoon. For this portion of the day, please bring a towel or mat if possible and wear comfortable clothing appropriate for movement.

In movement session 1, strength training will be explored in a variety of modalities, including small props, resistance bands and working with another dancer. Supplemental strength training should be dance-specific, with an understanding of both the functional and aesthetic needs of the dancer. It is essential that strength be developed with control and body integration, so that the risk of injury is reduced. The novice dancer needs assistance in learning safe strength training methods, starting by using the body’s own weight as resistance, and then moving to small weights. Finally, techniques including resistance equipment such as tubing or exercise bands, aqua bags, and kettle bells will be explored.

Movement session 2, the yoga session, will lead participants through a one-hour class in a form called fitness yoga. Fitness yoga, while not a spiritual form, mimics traditional yoga with a similar use of the breath and of the postures that endorse strength, balance and flexibility. Similar to Ashtanga yoga, it is an athletic practice with an intense focus on the conditioning of the body. Fitness yoga is a contemporary approach to an ancient format resulting in beneficial results for the dancer, and can be used as supplementary physical conditioning within a full-time dance training program.

Movement session 3 will explore the preparatory principles of Core Dynamics Pilates® (the Eve Gentry tradition) and their integration into dance practice and injury rehabilitation. Applicable by dance and fitness teachers, this method is an effective supplemental training system to balance the body by strengthening and stabilizing the core and postural support muscles, allowing greater mobility and range of motion in the spine and limbs. The session is appropriate for participants with all levels of movement experience.

During movement session 4, participants will be guided through numerous exercises that will challenge their core stability and balance. Both dynamic and static movements that integrate visual, vestibular and proprioceptive inputs will be explored during this interactive session. Exercises in this session will incorporate the most recent evidence regarding core stability, proprioception and balance training, as it relates to dance practice.

Movement session 5 will introduce basic exercises and concepts from Bartenieff Fundamentals (BF)SM and is created specifically for dance educators and dancers interested in increasing movement efficiency and expressivity. Bartenieff FundamentalsSM a series of principles and exercises developed by Irmgard Bartenieff, a student and colleague of Rudolf Laban. By identifying an individual’s movement patterns, BF offers possibilities for personal growth and change, cultivating greater inner connectivity and facilitating greater outer expressivity. The session will focus on the transference of knowledge, experiences, and sensations between floor and standing exercises, exploring concepts that include breath support, weight transfer, dynamic alignment, developmental patterning, initiation and sequencing, core support, and rotary factors.

Movement session 6 will explore Gyrokinesis®, an exercise system incorporating rhythm, fluidity, and full range of motion. It focuses on the natural elements of spinal movement to create a strong and mobile spine that supports joint articulations throughout the body. Gyrokinesis® involves the use of breath to create and support full body movement patterns. It stresses injury prevention by addressing the deeper core muscles, allowing full use of the upper and lower extremities. Through this process, one can move more efficiently and effortlessly, with greater range, power, speed, agility, suppleness and grace.

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Revised 2 August 2011

 

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