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IADMS 2018: Networking tips

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, 12 hours ago

Top tips for networking

 

As we approach our 28th Annual Conference, we’ve been putting together a few tips for networking that we hope will help you to feel confident in starting conversations and making new connections:

 

 

1.     Plan your attack. Look at the conference programme to get a feel of what’s happening when…and who will be where. This gives you a chance to make a (mental or physical) list of the sessions you’re interested in attending or the professionals you’re hoping to connect with. Once you have your list, do your research. You don’t have to conduct a full-fledged background check, but you should know enough about conference presenters, moderators, and attendees to easily strike up a conversation with them at any coffee break. (See the complete IADMS conference schedule here.)

 

 

2.     Have something to offer. A business card, a bold elevator speech, a snazzy outfit—give the people you meet something to remember you by. Tossing people squares of paper may seem like an antiquated way of exchanging contact information, especially in our LinkedIn era, but a well-crafted business card could set you apart from the crowd. If you don’t have a tangible representation of who you are, leave a lasting impression with confidence and style. It may seem cheesy, but practice introducing yourself into a mirror (or other inanimate object of your choosing) before you enter the conference space. Fashion a few words that make succinct who you are and what you’re currently interested in, and while you’re at it, piece together your wardrobe strategically. A tie tessellated with your alma-mater’s insignia or an intricately jewelled brooch picked up on your travels across Scotland could be an easy identifier and a perfect conversation-starter.

 

 

3.     Be the Question-Master. Questions are the functional spine of conferences, and for good reason. A well-crafted question that demonstrates deep understanding and genuine intrigue could spark the kind of dialogue gives rise to lifelong research collaborations. However, divining a good question on the spot can be daunting. When all seems to fail or an awkward silence shrouds a conversation, have a list of ready questions to pull from. For example, what’s an opportunity they wish they would’ve taken, what advice they would give when working in ____, or what first made them interested in____.

 

 

4.     Remember: Everyone is human. Whether you’re a young mind or a seasoned professional, you’ve probably experienced the trepidation and anxiety that comes with approaching a person to strike up a conversation that may lead to an exchange of contacts. But despite the advice presented here, you don’t necessarily have to open with a revolutionarily thought-provoking question or über-complimentary greeting. Sometimes, a simple “hi” and a smile will suffice. Even if you’re new to the conference scene, don’t underestimate the value of the knowledge you already have. Work with what you’ve got.

 

 

5.     Keep it fresh. Say your conversation did in fact lead to an exchange of contacts (hooray!), don’t let the opportunity pass. Try to send a follow-up “nice to meet you” email (or tweet or digital what-have-you) to those you hope to stay in contact with within 24 hours of meeting them. This ensures that you remain fresh in the contact’s mind and increases your likelihood for future communication.

 

 

We hope to make your visit in Helsinki as enjoyable as possible, if you are traveling from out of the country visit our facebook page to connect with others who are travelling: https://www.facebook.com/groups/IADMSstudents/ 

 

 

 

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IADMS 2018: Preparing for the conference

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, 12 hours ago

Getting ready for the conference: Students and Young Professionals

The annual conference is fast approaching and it’s time to start making plans. This year the conference takes place in the exciting city of Helsinki, Finland. Here are a few things we’ve been thinking about in preparation for heading to Helsinki…

 

Connecting with other students

The IADMS annual conference offers a unique opportunity to connect with peers and professionals who specialise in dance medicine and science. Here’s our top tips on how to make the most of this opportunity…

 

Top tips

      Attend the student social – this is a great way to meet other students at the beginning of the conference even begins!

      Connect on social media! Check out our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/groups/IADMSstudents/ and connect with other students before you even get to the conference!

      Attend a roundtable – this can be a great way to meet other students and professionals in your area. There is also the student roundtable, an opportunity to discuss key issues with students in dance medicine and science

      Check out the student networking session – this session brings together professionals from a wide range of dance medicine and science disciplines and gives you an opportunity to meet peers in your research area and to get to know the professionals in your area too.

      Networking – put yourself out there and try to talk to as many new faces as possible. The IADMS conference is a great place to make new connections and to talk to professionals who are as passionate about dance science as you are!

      Introduce yourself to the Student Committee - we’re really friendly and love getting to know others who share our passions ☺We’ll have a table in the exhibit hall this year, pop by and say hello and hear about what the student committee are up to!

 

Getting the most out of the conference

In addition to connecting with other students and professionals you want to make sure that you get the most out of what’s on offer at the conference and in the city of Helsinki.

 

Top tips

      Attend a variety of sessions not just your main area and try to sit down with the conference schedule before you go and plan out the sessions you want to check out

      Be brave – ask questions during the sessions and get involved!

      If you don’t fancy asking questions during the formal sessions, attend a roundtable. The roundtable is a great opportunity to engage in discussion with a smaller group of people on a more specific topic.

      Make the most of your breaks – use this time to try to get to know new people at the conference.

      Make the most of any free time to explore the city – this is one of the perks of being a part of an international association!

 

Student Events

Getting involved with student events can really help you to make the most out of your time at the conference and the events we have on offer mean that you can get to know some new people right at the beginning of the conference!

 

Student social

Our student social is a great way to meet other students before the meeting begins and to network with Dance Medicine and Science students from across the globe! For this years’ student social we have lined up a special treat for our student delegates! A backstage tour of the Finnish National Ballet Company and a chance to hear about their Healthy Dancer Programme. We will then head to the conference welcome drinks and on to grab pizza and a drink afterwards. Meet us at 6pm on Thursday 25th October in the hotel lobby.

 

Other student events and sessions include our student and young professionals networking event, the student roundtable and a workshop session: Dance Science in the Digital Age.

 

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Student perspectives: Dance Science in Finland

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, 12 hours ago

Student perspectives: Dance Science in Finland

With the Helsinki conference fast-approaching we were excited to talk to Finnish dance science student Oonasofia (Sofia) Saukkonen to find out more about the dance science scene in Finland! Sofia is a physiotherapist and dance scientist who graduated with an MSc from the University of Bedfordshire, UK in 2017. Currently, Sofia is working on a number of research projects, in addition to completing her BA in Dance Teaching at a Finnish university.

 

 

 - How did you first get interested in dance science/medicine?

 

Sofia: I am a physiotherapist and a dance scientist. The dance studio was my second home ever since I stepped there for the first time as a three-year old. As a teenager I started to dream of a professional career in dance and along the way, while working as a dancer and a dance teacher, I developed an interest in the functioning and biomechanics of the human body. I became a physiotherapist. After this, an MSc in dance science allowed me to deepen my understanding of dance practice from physiological, psychological, and biomechanical perspectives.

 

 

- Are you currently working on any research? Can you give us your elevator pitch about your research area?

Sofia: My forthcoming research will investigate improving dancers’ turnout, following my dissertation which focused on the same area. I am keen to better understand how dancers’ alignment may improve or deteriorate their performance, as well as its relation with injuries. I am also highly interested in the benefits of dance training for the non-dancing populations and how dance could benefit different groups of people used both in rehabilitation and as preventative practice.

 

 

- What are your plans now you've graduated?

 

Sofia: I graduated with an MSc from the University of Bedfordshire, UK in 2017 after which I have been doing some teaching at the university and focusing on a dance film project. The project is done in cooperation with a Finnish association run by women living with cancer (Siskot ry). Simultaneously I am finishing a BA in Dance Teaching in a Finnish university and planning my next research project that I will carry out in Finland. In the future, I hope to provide the Finnish dance community with information of dancers’ training and well-being, based on dance scientific research – in Finnish language.

 

 

- Can you tell us a bit about the dance medicine and science ‘scene’ in Finland?

 

Sofia: As mentioned before, I did my MSc in dance science in the UK. This programme does not exist in Finland. Instead, specializing in dance medicine e.g. for a physiotherapist happens often having background in dance, and by making the right choices during and after studies; with internships and dissertation subjects one has an opportunity to choose a path in dance medicine.

The key organization in dance medicine and science in Finland is DHF (Dance Health Finland ry). DHF works in promoting the well-being of Finnish dance students and professionals, but also aims to enhance the knowledge of Finnish health professionals working in the dance field. DHF also has a register for professionals working in the dance medicine field for dancers to easily find the right help as needed. We have some great experts specialized in dance medicine.

 

 

- What can you tell us about the arts and dance in Finland?

 

Sofia: In Finland, there are tens of thousands of recreational dancers. Professional dance activities, especially the number of companies and choreographers have grown strongly in recent decades. With a population of only 5.5 million people there are still many educational paths for one to aspire to a professional career in dance; four vocational schools and four universities offering higher education. Finnish professional dancer education is of a high standard and the dancers and choreographers often find employment not only in Finland but also internationally. They work in performing and increasingly also in other art-based activities such as community dance projects.

There are regional dance centres aiming to improve dancers’ employment, to increase dancers’ working possibilities, and supporting dancers’ collaboration; many professional organizations exist to support dance professionals in their work e.g. in providing training possibilities, developing the quality of dance education, or offering help in law-related matters. For a small country there is a great variety of dance festivals around the year. There is a magazine of the artists, phenomena and ideas on the Finnish dance scene publishes in English called ‘Finnish Dance in Focus’.

Probably the greatest and most important ongoing project now in dance in Finland is the Dance House Helsinki project. The Dance House will open its doors in 2020 and aims to help Helsinki become one of the leading cities of dance in Europe and worldwide. It will be open for all forms of dance providing versatile opportunities for collaboration, performance spaces, and high-level programme hoping to increase the number of dance spectators as well as international visits to Finland.

 

 

- What would you say to a student thinking of attending this year’s annual meeting in Helsinki, Finland?

 

Sofia: Helsinki is a vibrant and laid-back yet active city with charming architecture. One third of Helsinki is covered in green areas. It can be easily explored by foot and close to the conference venue you can find interesting places to visit whether you are into contemporary art (Kiasma), museums (The National Museum of Finland), walks in green parks next to water (City Park Hesperian Puisto), restaurants, or shopping in the centre. Within walking distance there are also the. Helsinki Music Centre and Finnish National Opera.

Public transportation is easy to use, and you will get along in English no matter where you go as most Finns speak fluent English. Last year the lowest temperature was -5°C and the highest +14°C in October so I guess it is good to be prepared for anything! Finland is a country with 188 000 lakes, the Northern Lights, and it is said to be the greenest country in the world. It is the home of Santa Claus, and one of the few countries where lost wallets often get returned to their owners. Not only is the IADMS Conference itself a great reason to visit Helsinki but if willing, you will find exciting things to explore and iconic places to see on your free time. I warmly welcome you to my home country!

 

For more information in English:

Dance Health Finland (DHF): https://www.dhf.fi/4

Dance House Helsinki: https://tanssintalo.fi/en/about-us/

Dance Info Finland: https://www.danceinfo.fi/en/infobank-category/education/

(Dance education, festivals, residencies, organizations, companies, and choreographers etc.)

 

Guides and Things to Do in Helsinki:

https://www.myhelsinki.fi/en

http://www.visitfinland.com/helsinki/

 

 

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Student and Young Professional Events at IADMS 2018

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, 12 hours ago

Our annual conference is fast approaching and there are some exciting student events this year!

Here’s a rundown of what not to miss if you’re a student or young professional heading to Helsinki this month…

 

Dance Science in the Digital Age

What? A workshop-style session focusing on the professional development of our student members through sharing real stories and experiences from early career dance medicine and science professionals with a focus on social media and online entrepreneurship.

When? Thursday 25th October, 5.00pm - 5.30pm

Where? Room Explore

 

Student and Young Professional Networking Workshop

What? An opportunity for students to connect with professionals and to build networks in their area of interest.

When? Thursday 25th October, 5.30pm - 6.00pm

Where? Room Explore

 

Student Social

Our student social is a great way to meet new faces at the beginning of the conference and to network with Dance Science students from across the globe!

What? This year we have a special treat lined up for our student delegates! A backstage tour of the Finnish National Ballet Company and a chance to hear about their Healthy Dancer Programme. We will then head to the conference welcome drinks and on to grab pizza and a drink afterwards.

When? Thursday 25th October, Finnish National Ballet Company Tour/Talk 6pm-7.30pm,

IADMS Welcome Drinks 7.30-9pm, Pizza and drinks, 9pm

Where? Meet at 6pm in the conference hotel lobby we will walk over together to the National Ballet. Pizza and drinks at Linko PizzaBar (a short walk from the welcome drinks).

 

Student Committee exhibit table

What? For the first time this year the student committee have an exhibit table. Come and find us among all the other exhibitors, meet your student committee, find out about upcoming initiatives such as mentorship and student affiliates and let us know what you think about the conference and what we can do in the future to help students to get the most out of it.

When? We will be manning the table in all of the conference breaks, grab a tea and come and say hello to your student committee!

Where? Exhibit Hall

 

Student Roundtable

What? An opportunity to gain insights from an international group of students on a range of topics and issues affecting students of dance medicine and science. Also a great opportunity to meet the IADMS student committee, hear about upcoming initiatives for IADMS student members and let them know what things you would like to see on offer in the future!

When? Friday 27th October, 1.30pm-3.30pm

Where? Room Imagine

 

 

 

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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with 'A Day For Teachers' Speaker - Martin Puttke

Posted By IADMS Dance Educators' Committee, Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Martin Puttke

 

1 – Could you tell us about your presentation theme at the 28 th IADMS Annual Conference (#IADMS2018)?

 

The explosive development of virtuosity and technique in contemporary dance/ballet frequently encounters not only the dancer’s physical limitation but also, and most importantly, the limitations of conventional teaching methods. Occasionally choreographers forget that performers have to incorporate their creations, which very often means that the latter have to hurl defiance at their physical boundaries - resulting in health problems or even hindering their artistic performance. In this presentation I will show the basic concept of my innovative teaching and working method in classical ballet. In order to respond pedagogically and methodically to the problem above mentioned, I will make use of a special kinematic analysis of dance elements by using a method of analysis borrowed from linguistic studies: The lexical function of the so-called morphemes. In any language, the smallest indivisible and yet meaningful unit of a word is called morpheme. The human motor system consists of just such comparable smallest units of a movement, what I call motor-morphemes. These motor-morphemes constitute any human movement, regardless of whether one is walking, lifting something, does sports or, for the purpose of this study, dancing. They are the core precept of every artistic movement, in classical as well as in contemporary dance. The conceptualization "dance art native motion system" (acronym DANAMOS) considers the existence of seven motor morphemes which are used in the kinematic analysis of all elements in the classical dance canons. The reduction of the technical structure of a dance movement to its core elements, the motor morphemes, greatly facilitates the understanding and physical learning of a complex movement - and prevents the excessive and exhausting physical work, the traditional "learning by doing". Furthermore, the motor morphemes permit a focus on the performer’s sole physical condition enacting more space to the performer’s artistic creativity and technical adaption - and most importantly to the dancers’ health. I have been practicing this didactic conceptualization for more than 30 years in ballet classes for children from the age of eight, as well as working with international ballet stars. It is very simple to understand, it only demands a change of thinking about dance technique. We tested this procedure with biomechanics and mathematicians in biomechanical lab. I will be presenting the hitherto results about the seven motor morphemes in the format of graphic and video material.

 

 

2 – Why is it important to discuss this topic with the IADMS community? What are the implications of this topic to the dance sector/dance health professionals?

 

The dance art native motion system gives dance art and dance medicine a common platform. This interface enables discussions and mutual understanding that promotes the implementation of medical and curatorial clues without directly affecting the aesthetic and artistic execution of dance elements. This anthropological perspective on such sophisticated system as classical dance allows the introduction of scientific knowledge of medicine, neuro-cognition and neurophysiology, biomechanics/kinematics or physics and mathematics, without being in danger of directly influencing artistic and aesthetic issues. The IADMS community will benefit on the following topics:

● How to avoid excessive physical work in the ballet studio

● Consideration of physical / anatomical individual installations

● The avoidance of accident causes in Allegro - especially petit allegro (this aspect is the focus of my presentation)

● Misunderstandings within the schools of the classical dance about body axis or technique of take-off from the ground in jumps, for instance.

● The primacy of aesthetics - en dehors - or stylistic norms at the expense of the health of the dancer

 

 

3 – How will your presentation help dance educators to apply research with students and participants in the classroom?

 

The dance art native motion system purposely separates the artistic aspects of movement execution from the physiological and functional ones. Through kinematic analysis, teachers and students will more clearly get the opportunity to perceive and incorporate the functionality of the individual body segments. However, by taking in account the seven morphemes which will function here as a “neutral basis” of the canon of the classical dance (aka DANAMOS) teachers and students can throw in together a much more successful collaboration with the medicine and the biomechanics. The dancer will better understand the physiological and functional foundations of every artistic movement sequence. In understanding those foundations, he/she will pour it on his/her individual artistic outline. The awareness and correction of a movement will be promoted as well as the cognitive architecture of the movement. On this basis, an especial form of ideokinetic training could be used to facilitate the student’s learning process. This is of enormous importance, especially for the correction of wrong movements, in periods of convalescence and also for the prevention of accidents. I strongly believe that a worthwhile interdisciplinary collaboration amongst art, medicine, neurocognition, physics and biomechanics benefits the dance and scientific community as a whole but above all dance students and teachers in the classroom.

 

 

4 - What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work?

 

IADMS brings together all the relevant scholars, dance pedagogues, doctors and dancers worldwide. It promotes a new sort of knowledge-sharing which is crucial for the dance community and its practical work, regardless of style or technique. The education for dance pedagogues is still lagging behind this development. Although dance medicine can not replace a deficiency of didactics and methodology it still can places the dancer's health in the foreground. Ultimately, it will inspire, guide and protect the teaching and working process with specific medical knowledge and empiricism. I am looking forward to learning new perspectives which will endow the innovational approach of the dance art native motion system.

 

 

5 - Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS?

 

I am confident that by attending the 2018 IADMS Conference I will gather valuable and insightful knowledge about the state of development in dance medicine and tie it in my research in dance didactics and to broaden my empirical knowledge.

 

 

6 - What do you think you are most looking forward to on this year’s conference?

 

To meet colleagues from dance medicine and dance education in order to establish interesting contacts to get beyond the conference in a hands-on exchange for future collaboration.

 

 

Martin Puttke Berlin, August 2018

 

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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with 'A Day For Teachers' Speaker - Jarmo Ahonen

Posted By IADMS Promotion Committee, Monday, October 1, 2018

 

 

Jarmo Ahonen

 

1. Could you tell us about your presentation theme at the 28th IADMS Annual
Conference (#IADMS2018)?

In dance and sports many teachers and coaches are demanding the same performances of all students. However, most people are a little bit different than the next one. Thus they should be trained more individually according their body types and especially according how they vary in bodies. The presentation gives some insight on these differences and how they could be trained safely.

 

2. Why is it import to discuss this topic with the IADMS community? 

IADMS has always been the top community to understand dancers' health and it is important that these scientific findings are brought to dance teachers' awareness.

What are the implications of this topic to the dance sector/dance health professionals?

This topic will shed light to understanding of how precious and still different people are and how they can still achieve great goals despite their differences.

 

3. How will your presentation help dance educators to apply research with students and participants in the classroom?

Dance educators are the key people to bring research in to practice. And by knowing more about the bodies of dancers teachers will be able to train students better by respecting dancers' bodies and not forcing the bodies over their anatomical limits. The real skill is to train different dancers differently.

 

4. What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work?

IADMS and working with dancers have changed my life as a physical therapy practitioner totally. Before I got the chance to participate IADMS conferences more than twenty years ago I was seeing human movement as a very simple task. Getting to know many great minds and their work in dance medicine field opened my eyes and mind to understand the beauty of human movement and also how it can be trained more carefully.

 

5. Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS annual conferences?

To meet great friends from many countries. Update my knowledge on dance medicine. Getting new ideas through the workshops.

 

6.What do you think you are most looking forward to on this year's conference?

The program is so full of gems and important issues that it is truly difficult to pick one or two specials. I'll see how it rolls out and play accordingly from day to day. I always enjoy meeting these wonderful people who practice dance medicine in some form.

 

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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with 'A Day For Teachers' Speaker - Katy Chambers

Posted By K. Michael Rowley, Monday, September 24, 2018

 

Katy Chambers MSc, Royal Academy of Dance, London

 

1. Could you tell us about your presentation theme at the 28th IADMS Annual Conference (#IADMS2018)? 

 

This session will be focussed on neuromuscular activation patterns…basically what that means is that we will be exploring movement from the perspective of identifying ‘cheat patterns’ and  trying out some techniques for undoing these. I think this is exciting and relevant as dancers often hold tension in unwanted areas e.g. neck and shoulders and this can be really challenging to correct just through instruction/cueing alone.

 

Arming dancers with the tools to be the strongest and most efficient movers they can be is a potentially very valuable in performance enhancement from both physical and aesthetic perspectives.

 

Participants should expect to move a little and think a lot.

 

 

2. Why is it import to discuss this topic with the IADMS community? What are the implications of this topic to the dance sector/dance health professionals?

 

The techniques I will introduce are typically confined to use in clinical contexts however I see so much potential for use with individual and groups of dancers way beyond this. I feel passionately that dance teachers and other movement practitioners should be empowered to observe and refine their dancers’ movement through effective approaches to facilitation which help to avoid or rectify cheat patterns along with their resultant muscular imbalance and increased injury risk. This is a preventative as well as corrective approach, which is crucial in being proactive in the dance training realm.

 

 

3. How will your presentation help dance educators to apply research with students and participants in the classroom?

 

I am really excited that my session will be part of the schedule for A Day for Teachers as this will mean that, as a group, we can have an interactive practical session that will hopefully raise some questions and offers tools for teachers to take back to their studios around the world.

 

Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate their own movement strategies as well as observing those of others. We will be using worksheets within the session which will act as notes / memory aids for teachers if they wish to try out some of the new ideas and techniques with their dancers.

 

 

4. What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work?

 

Through all disciplines represented in the IADMS membership and conference attendance, we have the shared aim of optimising experience for dancers. This approach to working has the potential to enhance performance, reduce injury risk and to empower dancers to self-direct their day to day management. IADMS offers us the opportunity to share and learn from one another in an open multidisciplinary environment.

 

 

5. Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS annual conferences?

 

I attend for a number of reasons, partly to catch up with like-minded colleagues from around the world and partly for the range of subjects addressed. As there are parallel sessions, I am inclined to attend many which sit outside of my own area of practice and research in order to widen the understanding I have of what is going on in the sector.

 

 

6.What do you think you are most looking forward to on this year’s conference?

 

I am really looking forward to delivering my session as I hope that participants will both enjoy it and ask lots of questions. I am anticipating it forming the start of a conversation as I’d love for teachers to keep in touch with me afterwards to share their experiences when they have the opportunity to try out the new techniques in their own teaching contexts.

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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with Invited Speaker - Matthew Wyon

Posted By IADMS Promotion Committee, Monday, September 24, 2018


Photographer: Erin Sanchez

 

Matthew Wyon

 

1. Could you tell us about your presentation theme at the 28th IADMS Annual Conference (#IADMS2018)? 

 

In my opinion research is pointless unless it is applied and utilized within the environment it has focused on. The roundtable “Embedding dance medicine and science into teaching and learning” will highlight how this has been done within a variety of scenarios and how science and medicine research can be used to support dance teaching.

 

 

2. How will your presentation help dance educators to apply research with students and participants in the classroom?   

 

There has been a huge acceleration in a wide range of dance medicine and science research within our extended community, which is excellent, that is intended to help dancers/teachers/health professionals enhance performance/learning or reduce injury incidence. But it often takes 4-5 studies to answer one small question and to the “research outsider” this can be seen to be overly complex and often written in an undecipherable/poorly accessible language. The work that we did at ArtEZ Conservatoire, Netherlands was a collaboration between scientists and artists to achieve an artistically driven outcome. Even when the goal is the same for the two parties the journey can be difficult as they speak different languages and use different maps.

 

 

3. What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work?

 

Within the Dance Science research team at the University of Wolverhampton the focus of our research is enhancing dance performance or injury reduction through intervention. IADMS conferences are therefore our primary forum for sharing our research with the wider community.

 

 

4. Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS annual conferences?

 

I have been attending IADMS conferences for the past 15+ years. Over this time I have met some wonderful colleagues who are now friends, it is probably the friendliest conference that I attend and very nurturing of new researchers/presenters. The conference also gives me the opportunity of hearing about current research and looking for future collaborations.

 

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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with Invited Speaker - Nicky Keay

Posted By IADMS Promotion Committee, Monday, September 17, 2018

 

1. Could you tell us about your presentation theme at the 28th IADMS Annual Conference (#IADMS2018)?  

Dance Endocrinology is the consideration of the interactive networks of hormones that influence both health and dance training and perforamnce.


2. Why is it import to discuss this topic with the IADMS community? What are the implications of this topic to the dance sector/dance health professionals?   
 
Typically imbalances in hormones can result in subtle changes, which my not be immediately obvious. Equally the cause of any endocrine disruption can be multifactorial. 

Nevertheless, identifying dancers with endocrine dysfunction is important to prevent adverse effects on health and therefore dance training and perforamnce. 

In particular, dancers are a group of athletes at risk of developing relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) as being light weight confers both a performance and aesthetic advantage. One of the consequences of RED-S is multiple endocrine network dysfunction and increased injury risk so dancers and all those working with dancers should be aware and alert to this situation. 

 


3. What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work? 

RED-S has only recently described in 2014 and significantly includes both male and female athletes/dancers. Therefore dissemination of the significance of RED-S through the IADMS community is important for safeguarding the health of dancers. 


4. Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS annual conferences? 

To enjoy and learn from the presentations and meet those with shared passion and intetest in dance medicine.

 


5. What do you think you are most looking forward to on this year’s conference? 

To be given the opportunity to put dance endocrinology centre stage and “do battle” on the topic of vitamin D. To hear from others about the multidisciplinary approach to dance medcine. Hoping to have to opportunity to do some Ballet.


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IADMS 2018 Helsinki: Interview with 'A Day For Teachers' Speaker - Nico Kolokythas

Posted By IADMS Dance Educators' Committee, Monday, September 10, 2018

 

1. Why is it import to discuss this topic with the IADMS community? What are the implications of this topic to the dance sector/dance health professionals?

 

 To my knowledge this is the first injury prevention intervention randomized controlled trial. Up until 2015 there have been two studies on injury prevention and both of them were psychological interventions. In 2016, a group of researchers from Belgium conducted a trial on injury prevention in dancers. Even though this was an important study, the biggest limitation was that they did not report what the intervention was, therefore, it is not possible to reproduce their results. 11+ Dance is a protocol with specified progressions and regressions of the exercises depending on the abilities of the dancers, therefore can be replicated. The results indicate some physiological responses and there is also an indication of a decrease in the injury incidence. 11+ Dance, however, needs to be investigated further as the picture is not complete yet. We need longitudinal studies in order to be able to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. 

 

2. How will your presentation help dance educators to apply research with students and participants in the classroom?

 

 In the movement session we will discuss the development of the intervention but also demonstrate the exercises of the protocol whilst explaining how to progress or regress a dancer. This session will be an opportunity to begin a dialogue with practitioners and teachers for further research in the topic of injury prevention in dance.

 

3. What are your thoughts on IADMS relevance for your field of work?

 

 IADMS strives to support the health of the dancer and also to push the boundaries in dance medicine and science. With such high prevalence of injuries in the dance sector I see IADMS as a key contributor for the dissemination of my research. I look forward to meet and discuss my study but also create links for possible collaborations in the field.

 

 4. Personally, what is the importance of attending to IADMS annual conferences?

 

 My first ever IADMS conference was in Hong Kong, where I presented my first observational study from my PhD journey. IADMS is the right place to meet like-minded people, challenge and get challenged, make friendships and collaborations, but more importantly stay up-to-date with what is happening in the sector as far as research is concerned. Since it is the biggest conference that focuses on research-based evidence I find it an essential conference to participate in, whether I am presenting any research or not.

 

5. What do you think you are most looking forward to on this year’s conference?

 

 I can’t hide the fact that I look forward to presenting this year at IADMS, as I will have completed my PhD. The list is too long to write everything down but any investigation that is related to training load is of interest to me so I look forward to listening to Sarah Needham-Beck presenting and Brenton Surgenor. Kelli Sharp seems to have an interesting study to present on Motor Stability, and I am always keen to listen to Jatin Ambegaonkar’s presentations. One of the my main aims though, as I mentioned above, is to meet and discuss possible collaborations with other practitioners/researchers.

 

 

Tags:  Annual Conference 

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