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5 Questions With... Jill Descoteaux

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Student representative Jill Descoteaux tells us a bit about herself and her role in IADMS. Jill was previously a member of the IADMS student committee and is currently a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program at Ohio University, combining professional counseling with athletic training.

 

How did you first get interested in dance science/medicine?
I was in the process of changing majors from Health Promotion to Athletic Training as an undergraduate student when I started to become more active in observing, learning, and practicing dance. Combining these two areas seemed very practical to me, so as a student I found creative ways to supplement my athletic training education with more opportunities in clinical practice with performing artists such as shadowing a dance-specific physician in Boston and providing supervised care for a dance team at the private high school where I was placed for my clinical rotation.



Can you tell us a bit about your role in IADMS?
While I am still learning what my role is, I am representing the student voice on the board of directors. Because a certain percentage of the membership is made up of students, my elected position is to give that percentage of the membership representation when discussing the direction of IADMS and expressing the needs of that membership.



What are you looking forward to in your role as student representative?
So far, I am really enjoying getting to know the other professionals who make up the board. These are people who have dedicated a lot to the field, and working alongside them is an honor. Second, I really look forward to addressing the needs of the students and bringing those needs and concerns to the board and finding ways to guide the organization to better serve that membership. Ideally creating opportunities and efficient means of connecting students to each other and other professionals is what I want to encourage over the next two years.


 

Are you currently participating in research? Can you give us your elevator pitch about your research area?
I am in the depths of my dissertation at the moment! In a nutshell, I am comparing the lived experiences of dancers in Australia to the experiences of dancers in America in terms of their relationship with health care. I am interested in access, communication, satisfaction, and knowledge under this umbrella. My data comes from in-person, in-depth interviews that I’ve just finished conducting this past August in Sydney.



In which ways has IADMS helped you grow in your field of study?
I would say IADMS has motivated and validated my career path of choice. Through meeting other members and being inspired by their local dancer-care services and structure, I feel that the work that I do fits into something greater and even crosses national borders. Feeling a part of that international community is really wonderful when in New Hampshire, I don’t have that community per se. Just as one example, I used IADMS to find Dr. Claire Hiller who is serving as the dance-specialist on my dissertation committee and without her help, my three months in Sydney may have been impossible. This relationship was formed through another connection that I made through the IADMS membership directory.

 

Tags:  5 Questions With  students 

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IADMS 2017: Student Events!

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Sunday, October 8, 2017

The Annual Meeting is upon us and there are some exciting student events this year!

 

Our student social is a great way to meet new faces during the conference and to network with Dance Science students from across the globe! This years’ student social will take place on the Friday night of the conference - meet us at 7.30pm in the conference hotel lobby and we will go from there!

 

Student committee members will be present throughout the meeting - look out for us at registration and in the Lamar room where we are setting up an interactive Q&A board - here you can post your questions to professionals and they will respond!

 

Other student events and sessions include our student and young professionals networking event and a panel discussion on building your career in dance medicine and science – see details below!

 

 

Student and young professional networking workshop

An opportunity for students to connect with professionals and to build networks in their area of interest.

What?

You will meet professionals from a variety of fields including education, research, medicine, athletic training, nutrition, and massage therapy in a fun speed-networking style session!

When?

Thursday 12th October, 5:30 - 6:20pm

Where?

Sam Houston Room

 

Student Social

Our student social is a great way to meet new faces at the meeting in an informal setting and to network with Dance Science students from across the globe!

What?

Networking and drinks (and possibly some ice cream…) with IADMS student members

When?

Friday 13th October, 7.30pm

Where?

Meeting in the lobby of the conference hotel - look out for members of the student committee there!

 

Building your career: a panel discussion on avenues to careers in dance medicine and science

What?

We will be hearing from experts in research, medicine, physical therapy, athletic training, and education. Please contribute to the discussion by submitting questions to the student committee located at registration!

When?

Sunday October 15th, 12:30-1:15pm.

Where?

Navarro/Hidalgo room

 

We look forward to welcoming you to the conference next week!

 

Your Student Committee

 

Tags:  Annual Conference  students 

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5 Conference Networking Tips

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Conferences—deceivingly pragmatic and academic in form—are nothing short of a whirlwind of emotions. For introverts, extroverts, and professed extroverted-introverts alike, conferences can be exhausting. Conceivably this is because conferences are often set up like the Fast and Furious version of a term in university, where it’s a mad dash to see how many notes you can scribble on a program booklet in a little over 72 hours. Yet perhaps this is because, at any one time, you are surrounded by people. A lot of people. But not just any people, magical people. These people are the people who are interested in the exact same things as you. So how are you going to talk to them?

 

As we approach the 27th Annual Conference for the International Association of Dance Medicine and Science in Houston, Texas, USA, the following are a few tips for networking that will hopefully help you feel invigorated by new friendships and meaningful connections:


1.    Plan your attack. Take a look at the conference program to get a feel of what’s happening when…and who will be where. This gives you a chance to make a (mental or physical) list of the sessions you’re interested in attending or the professionals you’re hoping to connect with. Once you have your list, do your research. You don’t have to conduct a full-fledged background check, but you should know enough about conference presenters, moderators, and attendees to easily strike up a conversation with them at any coffee break’s notice. (See the complete IADMS conference schedule here).


2.    Have something to offer. A business card, a bold elevator speech, a snazzy outfit—give the people you meet something to remember you by. Tossing people squares of paper may seem like an antiquated way of exchanging contact information, especially in our LinkedIn era, but a well-crafted business card could set you apart from the crowd. If you don’t have a tangible representation of who you are, leave a lasting impression with confidence and style. It may seem cheesy, but practice introducing yourself into a mirror (or other inanimate object of your choosing) before you enter the conference space. Fashion a few words that make succinct who you are and what you’re currently interested in, and while you’re at it, piece together your wardrobe strategically. A tie tessellated with your alma-mater’s insignia or an intricately jeweled brooch picked up on your travels across Scotland could be an easy identifier and a perfect conversation-starter.  


3.    Be the Question-Master. Questions are the functional spine of conferences, and for good reason. A well-crafted question that demonstrates deep understanding and genuine intrigue could spark the kind of dialogue gives rise to life-long research collaborations. However, divining a good question on the spot can be daunting. When all seems to fail or an awkward silence shrouds a conversation, have a list of ready questions to pull from. For example, what’s an opportunity they wish they would’ve taken, what advice they would give when working in ____, or what first made them interested in____.


4.    Remember: Everyone is human. Whether you’re a young mind or a seasoned professional, you’ve probably experienced the trepidation and anxiety that comes with approaching a person to strike up a conversation that may lead to an exchange of contacts. But despite the advice bestowed here, you don’t necessarily have to open up with a revolutionary, thought-provoking question or über-complimentary greeting. Sometimes, a simple “hi” and a smile will suffice. Even if you’re new to the conference scene, don’t underestimate the value of the knowledge you already have. Work with what you’ve got.


5.    Keep it fresh. Say your conversation did in fact lead to an exchange of contacts (hooray!), don’t let the opportunity pass. Try to send a follow-up “nice to meet you” email (or tweet or digital what-have-you) to those you hope to stay in contact with within 24 hours of meeting them. This ensures that you remain fresh in the contact’s mind and increases your likelihood for future communication.



Hopefully with these tips, you will be able make the most of your conference experience! Happy mingling!



Your Student Committee,
 
Siobhan, Andrea, Gabriel, Sutton, Madison, Carolyn, and Kali

 


Tags:  Annual Conference  students 

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Student Committee Conference Events and Introductions

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Tuesday, September 26, 2017

With the IADMS Student Committee around the corner we would like to put a face to our Student Committee names, feel free to hello at the conference!

 

We would love to introduce ourselves to you in person, feel free to visit our presentations, or at registration.

 

Student Committee presentations:

 

Student and young professional networking workshop Thursday, October 12th 5:30pm-6:20p

 

Building your career: a panel discussion on avenues to careers in dance medicine and science Sunday, October 15th noon-12:30pm

 

Student Committee members:

 

Siobhan Mitchell

Siobhan trained as a dancer before going on to complete a BA Hons in Dance Studies at the University of Roehampton, an MSc in Dance Science at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, and an MRes in Health and Wellbeing at the University of Bath. Awarded a full ESRC studentship in 2014, Siobhan is currently in the final year of her PhD studies at the University of Bath. Her research interests are in growth and maturation; specifically, psychosocial implications of differing maturity timing in young dancers. Siobhan works as an associate lecturer and delivers educational sessions for dancers and dance teachers on the topic of growth and maturation. Siobhan has been a member of IADMS since 2011 and has been on the IADMS student committee since 2014.

Gabriel Carrion-Gonzales

Gabriel from Albuquerque, New Mexico, began dancing at the age of 8 years old soon expanding his ballet training to study at Walnut Center for the Arts, Miami City Ballet, Gelsey Kirkland Academy for Classical Ballet, and Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet. Gabriel is now in his junior year of his undergraduate degree pursuing a double degree in biochemistry and psychology, with aims of being a sports medicine physician.

 

Carolyn Meder

Carolyn is originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she grew up studying ballet at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. Carolyn is currently attending the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio as an athletic training major. After completing her undergraduate studies, she hopes to pursue a master’s degree and eventually land a job in the field of dance medicine as an athletic trainer.

 

Kali Taft

Kali is a senior at Texas A&M University, pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Dance Science under the direction of Christine S. Bergeron and Carisa Armstrong. Along with performing in numerous faculty and student pieces, Kali has performed in works by Third Rail Dance Theatre, Eisenhower Dance, Kathy Dunn Hamrick, Jesse Zaritt, Erica Gionfriddo and Jane Weiner. Kali is a member of the Dance Science Committee and has also collaborated in an Undergraduate Research Project entitled “DAFT Steady Increase Training Versus Plyometric High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiovascular Levels in Collegiate Dancers”. She presented this research in Norfolk, Virginia at the National Dance Society Conference (NDS) and will present it in Houston, Texas at the International Association of Dance Medicine and Science (IADAMS). After graduation Kali plans to start her own dance company and continue performing and creating work to perform around the world.

 

Madison McGrew

Madison is a Florida native and recent graduate of the University of South Florida with bachelor’s degrees in Dance Performance and Biomedical Sciences. In 2016, she set off to London to pursue at MSc in Dance Science as Trinity Laban's first US-UK Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar. Madison has been a member of IADMS for 2 years and is excited to now be a part of the Student Committee!

 

Additional Student Committee members not mentioned above: Sutton Anker and Andrea Alvarez.


Tags:  Annual Conference  students 

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5 Questions With Kali Taft

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Saturday, September 2, 2017

 

-How did you first get interested in dance science/medicine?

 

I found out about dance science when touring Texas A&M when I was a senior in high school. I had no idea that this major existed, but as soon as I found out, I knew that was exactly the path I wanted to take for my undergraduate education.

  

 

-Are you currently participating in research? Can you give us your elevator pitch about your research area?

 

Yes, I have just finished with a research study entitled "Dance Aerobic Fitness Test Steady Increase Training versus Plyometric High Intensity Interval Training on Cardiovascular levels in collegiate dancers" and I will be presenting a poster of the research at IADMS in Houston this year.  This research study was a five week long study and the goal was to find out which training method is the best for dancers to use in preparation for performance season.  The results may surprise you! Come to IADMS this year to hear more details!

  

 

-As a student based in Texas, can you tell us a bit about the dance medicine and science ‘scene’ there?

 

Texas A&M has a lot of interest in the field.  In our program, anatomy is talked about in every technique class, a lot of research studies go on-faculty and student led- that students can participate in, and every year we do wellness screens for the students to learn about their own bodies and structural capabilities/limitations. 

 

 

-What would you say to a student thinking of attending this year’s annual meeting in Houston, Texas?

 

I think that IADMS is an enriching conference that could be beneficial for anyone in attendance. I am looking forward to hearing of the research being done in the field currently so I can update my practice and help protect my body better when dancing. I am also looking forward to making connections that could help me figure out the path I need to take in my life for the future. It is refreshing to be with people that are like-minded, and I am excited to be in a place that most of the other people share my passions.

 

 

-This year’s annual meeting is in Houston, in one sentence tell us what we can expect from the city…

 

Houston is definitely an exciting place to visit, and a good representation of the phrase "everything is bigger in Texas", so there is definitely enough to do for everybody! 

 

 

 

If you’d like to share your experiences, email us at student@iadms.org.

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5 Questions With…K. Michael Rowley

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Monday, May 8, 2017

This month’s featured member is K. Michael Rowley of the University of Southern California. Michael is a PhD candidate working in the Jacquelin Perry Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Lab in the Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy studying recurrent pain. His areas of interest include postural control, cognitive contributions to posture, dance injury prevention and recurrent low back pain.

-How did you first get interested in dance science/medicine?

Since grade school, I’ve been interested in the human body, biology, and movement. Separate from that, I pursued dance as a hobby in high school and minored in it at the University of Delaware (UD). It was there that Dr. Lynette Overby, a faculty member in the Dance Minor Program at UD, introduced me to the intersection of my two interests – dance and science. She recommended I look into IADMS, and I attended my first conference that year in Washington, D.C., USA. Dance is such a fruitful and rich field in which to observe, practice, and study concepts of human movement.

Pictured: Michael Rowley, Jeff Grimaldo, and Anne Grimaldo
of the Rudy Perez Ensemble in Santa Monica, CA.
Photo by Ben Licera.

-Are you currently participating in research? Can you give us your elevator pitch about your research area?

In the Jacquelin Perry Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Lab, working under my advisor Dr. Kulig, we study problems of recurrent pain. One specific group of patients we investigate are dancers with flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy, a condition sometimes called “dancer’s tendinitis”. We test different modifications to relevé exercises as potential prevention or non-surgical treatment interventions. This research was funded by the American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic Section's Performing Arts Special Interest Group. Another population we study is persons suffering from recurrent low back pain. We investigate different mechanisms that may contribute to altered postural control in these persons even during periods of pain remission.


-What are your plans after graduation?

After graduation, I plan to pursue a post-doc in order to expand my research knowledge and skills. After that, I’ll begin looking for a faculty position at a university where I can work closely with both a kinesiology or biomechanics department and a dance program. It’s a passion of mine to keep these two areas communicating and connecting so we can (a) learn how to improve dancer health and performance, (b) investigate general principles of movement and motor control by studying dancers, and (c) develop dance-like interventions for other populations and patient groups.

-Which annual meeting has been your favorite so far and why?

 

 Pittsburgh was my favorite annual meeting. Being my fourth meeting, professionals began recognizing me, saying hello, and asking about my work. It was very cool to start feeling part of the community. Also, my sister was in her senior year at the University of Pittsburgh studying Athletic Training. She also attended the meeting to learn about how to better treat dancers. We had so much fun being in a professional setting and learning together! I am very grateful for this experience that I know most siblings with diverse interests do not get to share. My sister, Whitney, has since graduated and is now an Athletic Trainer employed by UPMC and working with the dance students at Point Park University – using knowledge she gained from the IADMS meeting on a pretty-much-daily basis. We still chat often about what she’s learning while helping these dancers perform at their best and prevent and recover from injury.

 

Pictured: Michael Rowley and Whitney Rowley at IADMS2015 in Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

-In which ways has IADMS helped you grow in your field of study and what would you say to a student thinking of joining IADMS?

 

 IADMS has provided invaluable networking opportunities. Some of these have already begun paying off as we at USC have been able to collaborate with other dance science and health researchers in the area and internationally. As we’ve moved forward on our tendinopathy research, I’ve reached out to IADMS experts for help and advice from something as simple as “How do you quantify and define dance volume/exposure on your questionnaires?” to something as cool as being able to send ultrasound images and videos of the flexor hallucis longus tendon to international foot and ankle surgeons and experts to discuss potential abnormalities in the images. Other networking benefits I’m sure will continue to pay off as I look for post-doc and faculty positions. Not to mention simply how fun and friendly most of the dance medicine and science community is.

 

 If you’re interested, give it an honest shot. I think it’s easy to join for one year and attend the annual meeting when it’s near you. While that’s a great start and I’m sure you will benefit immensely from attending, to get the most out of IADMS it takes a commitment to the community. After two or three years attending and networking, you will start to see the community giving back. After the meeting, reach out to speakers and professionals you learned something from – introduce yourself, share your interests and goals, and thank them for the work they do. Pretty quickly, you’ll be able to express for yourself the benefits of being a part of the international dance medicine and science community.

 

Pictured: Michael Rowley and Pamela Oppenheimer.
Photo by Dan Dunlap.

 

If you’d like to share your experiences, email us at student@iadms.org

 

 

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Student Events at the 2016 Conference in Hong Kong

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Our Annual Conference is fast approaching and there are some exciting student events this year!

 

Our student social is a great way to meet new faces before the conference begins and to network with Dance Science students from across the globe! This years’ student social will take place the Wednesday before the conference begins to give you a chance to meet up in person before attending the conference.

Other student events and sessions include our student and young professionals networking event, the student roundtable and presentations on The future of dance medicine & science: An IADMS student survey, and Building your career: how to establish and foster a mentor-mentee partnership in your interest area – see details below!

 

Student Social

Our student social is a great way to meet new faces before the meeting begins and to network with Dance Science students from across the globe!

What?

Networking and drinks with IADMS student members

When?

Wednesday 19th October, 7pm

Where?

Meeting on the steps in front of the Jockey Club Amphitheatre at the Hong Kong Academy for the Performing Arts. 

 

Student Roundtable

What?

An opportunity to gain insights from an international group of students on a range of topics and issues affecting students of dance medicine and science.

When?

Friday 21st October, 2pm – 3.30pm

Where?

Atrium Lounge 1st Floor

 

Building your career: how to establish and foster a mentor-mentee partnership in your interest area

What?

For many aspiring dancers, clinicians, educators, and researchers, locating a mentor or an advisor in fields of interest as specific as those in dance medicine and science can be a daunting task. This talk will provide information for students and recent graduates about the value of having a career mentor and will discuss the process of finding, pursuing, and building a mentorship relationship. Topics will include: how to utilize peers and school resources to make connections with potential mentors, suggestions for contacting and pursuing potential mentors, ways to develop and maintain an ongoing mentor - mentee relationship, and tips for being an excellent mentee candidate.

When?

Saturday October 22, 4.45pm – 5pm

Where?

Recital Hall

 

The future of dance medicine & science: An IADMS student survey

What?

The IADMS Student Committee will present a retrospective snapshot of student membership and Educational Opportunities to illustrate a clear picture of the future of Dance Medicine & Science within the IADMS community to answer a question of “where is this field headed based on the current student interest?”

When?

Saturday October 22, 5pm – 5.15pm

Where?

Recital Hall

 

Student and Young Professional Networking Workshop

What?

An opportunity for students to connect with professionals and to build networks in their area of interest.

When?

Saturday October 22, 5.30pm – 6.30pm

Where?

Studio 8

 

Tags:  Annual Conference  Annual Meeting  students 

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Getting ready for the conference: Students and Young Professionals

Posted By the IADMS Student Committee, Thursday, July 14, 2016

The annual conference is fast approaching and it’s time to start making plans. This year the exciting city of Wanchai, Hong Kong will be on the map as the second Asian location for the meeting to be held. Here are a few things we’ve been thinking about in preparation for heading to the tropical paradise in a cosmopolitan city, which happens to have the highest density of 7-Eleven shops in the world AND the world’s largest collection of skyscrapers…

 

Accommodation

If you’re looking to meet up with other student members AND cut some costs why not find a roommate on our student forum. Don’t forget that you need a current membership to access the forums! This can be a great way to get to know other members and will mean you have company finding your way to/from the conference. If you’re in the UK and are looking for a roommate, you might also want to join the Dance Science Study UK Facebook group and share a post there, we’ve met loads of great new people this way!

 

Travel

Getting between the airport and the city…

You might want to start thinking about your travel plans for when you arrive in Hong Kong. This way, instead of feeling flustered when you arrive you can take in the sights and sounds of Hong Kong!

The airport express is the fastest way to get between the airport and the city, reaching Hong Kong Island in around 24 minutes. Airport Express allows free in-town check-in services for major airlines; passengers are also able to take a free shuttle bus from Kowloon and Hong Kong stations to major hotels. More information on the free shuttle bus here.

 

Getting to the conference venue…

Planning your route between where you’re staying and the conference venue ahead of time will also help you to make the most of your time in Hong Kong. If you’re presenting or hoping to make it to the conference for a particular session or workshop, you don’t want to be worrying about how to get there.

The quickest and most efficient way to get around Hong Kong is traveling via the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system. It covers major districts in Hong Kong, which includes stops at the boundary with Mainland China (Lok Ma Chau Station and Lo Wu Station). 

The Academy is located roughly mid-way between the Admiralty and Wanchai MTR stations, although it is slightly closer to Admiralty (take exit D signposted to the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts).

Another option is to use the bus. Buses in Hong Kong are comfortable, plentiful and mostly air-conditioned. They are popular for watching the great views from the top deck of the double-deckers.

Bus route guide for the conference venue:

A) A12, 18, 18P, 18X, 40M, 590, 720, 720A, 722, 780, 788

B) 2, A12, 18, 18P, 18X, 70, 104, 260, 307, 309, 590, 720, 720A, 720P, 722, 780, 788, 930A, 930X, 967X, 969X


Connecting with other students

The IADMS annual conference offers a unique opportunity to connect with peers and professionals who specialise in dance medicine and science. Here’s our top tips on how to make the most of this opportunity…

Top tips

·         Attend the student social – this is a great way to meet other students before the conference even begins!

·         Attend a roundtable – this can be a great way to meet other students and professionals in your area. There is also the student roundtable, an opportunity to discuss key issues with students in dance medicine and science

·         Check out the student networking session – this session brings together professionals from a wide range of dance medicine and science disciplines and gives you an opportunity to meet peers in your research area and to get to know the professionals in your area too.

·         Networking – put yourself out there and try to talk to as many new faces as possible. The IADMS conference is a great place to make new connections and to talk to professionals who are as passionate about dance science as you are!

·         Introduce yourself to the Student Committee - we’re really friendly and love getting to know other young people who share our passions J

 

Getting the most out of the conference

In addition to connecting with other students and professionals you want to make sure that you get the most out of what’s on offer at the conference and in the city of Hong Kong.

Top tips

·         Attend a variety of sessions not just your main area and try to sit down with the conference schedule before you go and plan out the sessions you want to check out

·         Be brave – ask questions during the sessions and get involved!

·         If you don’t fancy asking questions during the formal sessions, attend a roundtable. The roundtable is a great opportunity to engage in discussion with a smaller group of people on a more specific topic.

·         Make the most of your breaks – use this time to try to get to know new faces at the conference and to talk to new people.

·         Make the most of any free time to explore the city – this is one of the perks of being a part of an international association!

 

Student Events

Getting involved with student events can really help you to make the most out of your time at the conference and the events we have on offer mean that you can get to know some new faces before the conference even begins!

Student social

Our student social is a great way to meet other students before the meeting begins and to network with Dance Medicine and Science students from across the globe! This years’ student social will take place the Wednesday before the conference begins to give you a chance to meet up in person before attending the conference.

 

Other student events and sessions include our student and young professionals networking event, the student roundtable and presentations on The future of dance medicine & science: An IADMS student survey and Building your career: how to establish and foster a mentor-mentee partnership in your interest area

 

Little things…

Something as small as having the right travel charger can be the key to making your trip a success.

Travel chargers – The electric power is 220 Volt, 50 Hertz. A power converter is necessary to avoid damage to computers designed specifically for 120 V. Hong Kong uses a Type G electrical plug that has three rectangular blades in a triangular pattern and has an incorporated fuse (usually a 3 amps fuse for smaller appliances such as a computer and a 13 amps one for heavy duty appliances such as heaters). Check out this website for info on what type of adapter you will need.

 

Watch this space! More details to come on our student events in our upcoming blog posts :)

Tags:  Annual Meeting  Conference  students 

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From Student to Professional: Raising the next generation of IADMS – cheers to the next 25 years: A recap of student events at the 25th Annual Meeting

Posted By Carina (Stern) Nasrallah on behalf of the IADMS Student Committee, Saturday, October 24, 2015

  


Students from all over the globe had the opportunity to interact with colleagues and professionals alike at a variety of student-oriented events at this year’s Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  The evening prior to the start of the annual meeting, students mingled at a local Pittsburgh bar, catching up with old friends and making new acquaintances.  Later during the weekend, Dr. Jeffrey Russell from Ohio University spoke to students about the process of publishing research in a peer-reviewed journal such as the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science.  He encouraged students not to be daunted by the prospect of publishing research but to view it as an opportunity to contribute to the expanding body of dance medicine literature and show pride in their hard work. A quote that stuck out from his talk was, “if you produce excellent work, people will notice,” which was encouraging students to continue to produce high quality research and writing over a span of time, and excellence can be achievable. 

A highlight of the student events was a stimulating networking session hosted on the second evening of the conference.  Eight different sub-disciplines of dance medicine & science were represented including medicine, physical therapy, athletic training, research, nutrition, psychology, dancer wellness screening, education, and advocacy.  Each group had the opportunity to engage with one or more professionals currently working in the field.  The room was a buzz with questions and discussion.  The enthusiasm was contagious as these students found themselves surrounded by like-minded peers who were equally curious to learn about careers in dance medicine & science.


 


Scattered around the room were a contingent of young professionals who had recently made the transition from student to professional.  They had attended previous annual meetings or joined IADMS as student members and had “grown up” in the IADMS; learning, growing, and connecting, and eventually trading in their student membership for professional status. They were able to share about their own challenges and victories with pursuing careers as recently as the past few months; some were even currently seeking employment. As the International Association for Dance & Science celebrated its 25th anniversary, likewise it celebrated the raising up of the first generation of researchers, educators, healthcare practitioners, and advocates in the field of dance medicine & science.  The student attendees of this year’s conference are the professionals of tomorrow and it is indeed their passion and knowledge that will carry forward the legacy of IADMS for the next 25 years.


Tags:  Annual Meeting  students 

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Student Events at the 2015 Annual Meeting

Posted By IADMS Student Committee, Friday, October 2, 2015

The 25th Annual Meeting is fast approaching and the Student Committee is hosting and facilitating many exciting events for student members this year. The Student Social is an informal event, which will allow for students (21+) to connect in a relaxed environment the night before the Annual Meeting begins. A session for anyone interested in publishing is also on the schedule, hosted by the committee and presented by Jeffrey Russell (PhD, AT, Athens, Ohio, USA). Dr. Russell will be talking about his personal experiences with publishing research, highlighting specific challenges and discussing strategies to overcome each. As a part of our mission to drive connections between students and professionals, a Networking Session is one of our most anticipated events for the meeting. Students will have an opportunity to interact with many professionals in a variety of areas of Dance Medicine & Science including physiotherapists, educators, physicians, and researchers. Please see the descriptions of each event below for more information.

 

We can’t wait to meet and see all of you in just a week!

 

If you have any questions or comments, contact us at student@iadms.org

 

Student Social

What?

Networking and drinks with IADMS student members

When?

8th October, 7.30-10.30pm

Where?

The upstairs VIP lounge at Olive or Twist (http://www.olive-twist.com)

140 6th St. Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Important info

Students must be age 21+ to attend and will need to show ID for entrance.

 

Publishing your research: Advice from the Experts

What?

Aiming to publish your latest research study? Not sure where to start? Looking for the latest and greatest tips on publishing, specific to dance medicine and science? Then our session on publishing your research is the place to be! This talk will provide information for those who are interested in writing and publishing research in the field of dance medicine and science. There will be plenty of opportunities to ask questions and discuss your thoughts at the end of the session.

When?

Saturday 10th October, 6.00 - 6.10pm

Where?

Salons 4-5

 

Student Networking Event

What?

Our student networking event is an opportunity for students to connect with professionals and to build networks in their area of interest. This could be your chance to mingle with academics whose papers you’ve been reading all year, your chance to ask about their journey in dance medicine and science, or maybe even be the chance to find a mentor! Our student networking event is the perfect time and place so come along!

When?

Saturday 10th October, 6.45pm

Where?

Salons 4-5

Tags:  Annual Meeting  students 

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